Application of EMDR and Brainspotting with Addiction and Mental Health

2017/Jan-Feb

In writing this article, it is important to understand that once trained in eye movement and desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) and brainspotting, the applications can be limitless.

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SUD Treatment among US Minority Populations: Models of Success

2017/Jan-Feb

Substance use disorders (SUDs) affect various people around the world. There are many factors that contribute to people’s substance use, including gender, age, home environment, and family history; these subsequently affect their success in treatment. Race seems to be another important factor that affects success in SUD treatment.

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Gambling, Relapse, and Recovery: Studying a New Technology

2017/Jan-Feb

The problem of compulsive gambling—although often widespread and severe and with considerable negative consequences, not only for gamblers but also for their families—is often not recognized as one of the addictions. It too, has a human brain cone connection with cognitive, emotional, and psychological components.

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The Addictive Dilemma: Clinical Hypnosis for Addicted Clients

2017/Jan-Feb

“Each person is a unique individual. Hence, psychotherapy should be formulated to meet the uniqueness of the individual’s needs, rather than tailoring the person to fit the Procrustean bed of a hypothetical theory of human behavior.” – Dr. Milton H. Erickson (The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, 2016)

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An Initial Evaluation of a Comprehensive Continuing Care Intervention for Clients with Substance Use Disorders: My First Year of Recovery (MyFYR)

2017/Jan-Feb

Substance use disorders (SUD) often have a chronic course, characterized by cycles of abstinence, light use, and heavy use. Wider availability of effective continuing care has been re-ommended to increase rates of sustained recoveries and limit the severity and duration of relapse episodes that do occur (Dennis & Scott, 2007; McKay, 2010).

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Focus on Family Recovery: An Interview with Sharon Wegscheider-Cruse, MA

2017/Jan-Feb

Before the 1980s, family members interacting with addiction professionals were more likely to be viewed as contributors to addiction or hostile interlopers in the treatment process than people in need of recovery support services. That began to change when a vanguard of advocates challenged such attitudes and focused attention on the effects of addiction on families and the family recovery process.

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